Positive psychology interventions in practice

Book
Proctor, C.
New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2017)

Measuring eudaimonic well-being

Book Chapter
Proctor, C., & Tweed, R.
J. Vitterso (Ed.), Handbook of eudaimonic well-being (pp. 277-294). Springer International Publishers Switzerland
(Publication year: 2016)

The Rogerian fully functioning person: A positive psychology perspective

Abstract
Proctor, C., Tweed, R., Morris, D.
Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 56 (5), 503-529
(Publication year: 2016)

Two studies examined the characteristics of the Rogerian fully functioning person from the positive psychology perspective. Based on the findings of extant research in support of the Rogerian metatheoretical model, indicators were selected to represent characteristics constituting the fully functioning person. Using confirmatory factor analysis, a single factor structure of the fully functioning person was assessed with young adults aged 16 to 19 years ( = 16.86). Participants of both studies completed measures of life satisfaction, positive thoughts and feelings, authenticity, organismic valuing, aspirations, basic psychological needs, anxiety, and strengths use. Participants of Study 2 also completed a measure of character strengths endorsement. Analyses revealed that variables consistent with the Rogerian fully functioning person loaded positively on a single “fully functioning person” factor. Overall, results suggest that the fully functioning person is high in life satisfaction, has increased positive thoughts and feelings and decreased negative thoughts and feelings, low anxiety, and moves toward intrinsic values rather than extrinsic values. The fully functioning person component was positively correlated with the character strengths of enthusiasm, bravery, honesty, leadership, and spirituality and negatively correlated with modesty and fairness. Results supplement research indicating strong links between positive psychology and the person-centered theory of Carl Rogers.

Enhancing well-being in youth: Positive psychology interventions for education in Britain

Book Chapter
Proctor, C.
M. Furlong, R. Gilman, & E.S. Huebner (Eds.), Handbook of positive psychology in schools (2nd edition) (pp. 416-432). London: Routledge
(Publication year: 2014)

Child and adolescent life satisfaction

Book Chapter
Proctor, C.
A. Michalos (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research (pp. 663-672). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2014)

Subjective well-being

Book Chapter
Proctor, C.
A. Michalos (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research (pp. 6437-6441). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2014)

Life satisfaction in youth

Book Chapter
Proctor, C., & Linley, P.A.
C. Ruini, & G.A. Fava (Eds.), Increasing psychological well-being in clinical and educational settings (Cross-cultural advancements in positive psychology 8). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2014)

The importance of good character

Book Chapter
Proctor, C.
C. Proctor, & P.A. Linley (Eds.), Research, applications, and interventions for children and adolescents: A positive psychology perspective (pp. 13-21). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2013)

Surveying the landscape of positive psychology for children and adolescents

Book Chapter
Linley, P.A., & Proctor, C
C. Proctor, & P.A. Linley (Eds.), Research, applications, and interventions for children and adolescents: A positive psychology perspective (pp. 1-9). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2013)

Happiness in the classroom

Book Chapter
Fox Eades, J.M., Proctor, C., & Ashley, M.
S.A. David, I. Boniwell, & A.C. Ayers (Eds.), Oxford handbook of happiness (pp. 579-591). Oxford: Oxford University Press
(Publication year: 2013)

Life satisfaction

Book Chapter
Proctor, C., Maltby, J., & Linley, P. A.
R.J.R. Levesque (Ed.), Encyclopedia of adolescence (pp. 1606-1614). New York, NY: Springer
(Publication year: 2010)

Youth life satisfaction measures: A review

Book Chapter
Proctor, C., Linley, P.A., & Maltby, J.
F. Huppert, & P.A. Linley (Eds.), Happiness and well-being: Critical concepts in Psychology (Vol. 1) (pp. 103-133). London: Routledge
(Publication year: 2010)

A central construct within the positive psychology literature is life satisfaction. Whereas adult life satisfaction has been studied extensively, the life satisfaction of children and adolescents has only received attention more recently. This article provides a review of the extant research on youth life satisfaction. Empirical studies (n = 141) on life satis- faction among youth are reviewed. The review details how life satisfaction among youth relates to various other important emotional, social, and behavioural constructs. Evidenced by the review are the conditions that foster positive life satisfaction and the implications of positive life satisfaction among youth. Future directions in life satisfaction research among youth are briefly discussed.

Research, applications, and interventions for children and adolescents: A positive psychology perspective. New York, NY: Springer

Book
Proctor, C., & Linley, P.A.

(Publication year: 2013)

Strengths Gym: Build and exercise your strengths! St. Peter Port, Guernsey: PPRC

Book
Proctor, C., & Fox Eades, J.

(Publication year: 2011)

Strengths Gym: Teacher’s manual. St. Peter Port, Guernsey: PPRC

Book
Proctor, C., & Fox Eades, J.

(Publication year: 2009)

Strengths Gym: Year 7. St. Peter Port, Guernsey: PPRC

Book
Proctor, C., & Fox Eades, J.

(Publication year: 2009)

Strengths Gym: Year 8. St. Peter Port, Guernsey: PPRC

Book
Proctor, C., & Fox Eades, J.

(Publication year: 2009)

Strengths Gym: Year 9. St. Peter Port, Guernsey: PPRC

Book
Proctor, C., & Fox Eades, J.

(Publication year: 2009)

The naturally emerging structure of well-being among young adults:

Abstract
Proctor, C., Tweed, R., Morris, D
Journal of Happiness Studies, 16 (1), 257-275
(Publication year: 2015)

This study explored common measures of well-being to assess whether the naturally emerging relationships are best explained by a “Big Two” (hedonic vs. eudaimonic) or another, yet to be discovered framework. A sample of young adult participants (n = 355) completed measures of life satisfaction, flourishing, positive and negative experience, meaning in life, basic psychological needs, and subjective happiness. Goldberg’s (2006) Bass-Ackward procedure of component analysis was used to determine the relationship between the variables. Results indicated that life satisfaction and flourishing loaded on both hedonic and eudaimonic variables at several levels of the analysis, suggesting that these constructs may be outcomes of both hedonia and eudaimonia. Results further indicated that searching for meaning was distinct from hedonia, but was not an effective indicator of eudaimonic well-being. Overall, the results justify the distinction between hedonia and eudaimonia; however, they also suggest that further distinctions between different measures of well-being are required. Moreover, life satisfaction may be a superordinate category that reflects outcomes of both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Thus, the “Big Three” of positive psychology (i.e., positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction) is neither purely hedonic, nor purely eudaimonic, nor a balanced combination of the two, and thus is deficient as an indicator of either type of well-being. Furthermore, the results suggests that further understanding the place of life satisfaction within hedonic and eudaimonic conceptualizations of happiness is important in enhancing our overall understanding of well-being.

Strengths Gym: The impact of a character strengths-based intervention on the life satisfaction and well-being of adolescents

Abstract
Proctor, C., Tsukayama, E., Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Fox Eades, J. M., & Linley, P. A
Journal of Positive Psychology, 6 (5), 377-388
(Publication year: 2011)

This preliminary research study examined the impact of Strengths Gym, a character strengths-based positive psychological intervention program, on adolescent life satisfaction. Using a quasi-experimental treatment-control condition design, the study compared student outcomes for life satisfaction, positive and negative affect, and self-esteem for 319 adolescent students aged 12-14 (M = 12.98); 218 adolescent students who participated in character strengths-based exercises in the school curriculum, and 101 adolescent students who did not participate in character strengths-based exercises in the school curriculum. Results revealed that adolescents who participated in character strengths-based exercises experienced significantly increased life satisfaction compared to adolescents who did not participate in character strengths-based exercises. Overall, results provide encouraging preliminary support for the application of character strengths-based exercises in the school curriculum as a means of increasing life satisfaction and well-being among youths.

Strengths use as a predictor of well-being and health-related quality of life

Abstract
Proctor, C., Maltby, J., & Linley, P. A.
Journal of Happiness Studies, 12 (1), 153-169
(Publication year: 2011)

There is a growing body of research devoted to the examination of character strengths as conceptualized by Values-In-Action (VIA) strengths classification system. However, there remains a dearth of research examining generic strengths use and its relationship with well-being, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and VIA character strengths. In this cross-sectional study, 135 undergraduate university students completed measures of strengths use, subjective well-being (SWB), self-esteem, self-efficacy, and HRQOL, and endorsed five top VIA strengths. Results revealed strengths use is a unique predictor of SWB, but not HRQOL. The VIA strengths of hope and zest were significant positive predictors of life satisfaction. The most commonly-endorsed VIA strengths were: love, humor, kindness, social intelligence, and open-mindedness. The least-endorsed VIA strengths were: leadership, perseverance, wisdom, spirituality, and self-control. Overall, results suggest an important link between generic strengths use and specific VIA strengths and their impact on SWB.

Hope uniquely predicts objective academic achievement above intelligence, personality, and previous academic achievement

Abstract
Day, L., Hanson, K., Maltby, J., Proctor, C., & Wood, A.
Journal of Research in Personality, 44 (4), 550-553
(Publication year: 2010)

A 3-year longitudinal study explored whether the two-dimensional model of trait hope predicted degree scores after considering intelligence, personality, and previous academic achievement. A sample of 129 respondents (52 males, 77 females) completed measures of trait hope, general intelligence, the five factor model of personality, divergent thinking, as well as objective measures of their academic performance before university (‘A’ level grades) and final degree scores. The findings suggest that hope uniquely predicts objective academic achievement above intelligence, personality, and previous academic achievement. The findings are discussed within the context of how it may be fruitful for researchers to explore how hope is related to everyday academic practice.

Very happy youths: Benefits of very high life satisfaction among youths

Abstract
Proctor, C., Linley, P. A., & Maltby, J.
Social Indicators Research, 98 (3), 519-532
(Publication year: 2010)

This study investigated the characteristics of adolescents reporting very high levels of life satisfaction. Participants (N = 410) were divided into three life satisfaction groups: very high (top 10%), average (middle 25%), and very low (lowest 10%). Results revealed that very happy youths had significantly higher mean scores on all included school, interpersonal, and intrapersonal variables, and significantly lower mean scores on depression, negative affect, and social stress than youths with average and very low levels of life satisfaction. Life meaning, gratitude, self-esteem, and positive affect were found to have a significantly more positive influence on global life satisfaction for the very unhappy than the very happy. Findings suggest that very unhappy youths would benefit most from focused interventions aimed at boosting those variables having the most influence on their level of life satisfaction. Results are discussed in light of previous findings and suggestions for future directions are briefly discussed.

Applied positive psychology: An introduction and applications in childhood and adolescence

Book Chapter
Linley, P.A., & Proctor, C. (in press)
M. Salama & A. Delle Fave (Eds.), Positive psychology for all: Introduction, concepts, and applications in school age (Vol. 1). Cairo, Egypt
(Publication year: 2014)

Children's intrinsic and extrinsic values: Sources of internalization and implications for well-being

Abstract
Linley, P. A., Proctor, C., McSorley, B., & Kasser, T.
Unpublished manuscript
(Publication year: 2009)

This study examined the acquisition of intrinsic and extrinsic values among children. Participants (N = 218) completed measures of intrinsic and extrinsic values, happiness, life satisfaction, and anxiety, and rated their hero’s perceived values and the importance placed on each of these values by their caregiver. Results revealed that children’s intrinsic values were associated with greater life satisfaction and happiness, whereas extrinsic values were associated with lower behaviour ratings made by classroom teachers. Children’s intrinsic values were significantly predicted from the intrinsic values internalized from their caregivers and their hero’s perceived intrinsic values, whereas extrinsic values were significantly predicted from the extrinsic values internalized from their caregivers, their hero’s perceived extrinsic values, and their best friend’s extrinsic values. Internalized values for caregivers and hero’s perceived values significantly predicted children’s intrinsic and extrinsic values.

Youth life satisfaction measures: A review

Abstract
Proctor, C., Linley, P. A., & Maltby, J.
Journal of Positive Psychology, 4 (2), 128-144
(Publication year: 2009)

The burgeoning field of positive psychology has highlighted the need to discover what makes life worth living. Within this framework is the exploration of how youths perceive their lives and achieve happiness. Recent research demonstrates that perception of life satisfaction among youths has important implications for their psychological, social, and educational functioning. An important part of understanding how youths perceive their lives is the incorporation of measurement of life satisfaction, and this article provides a review of the extant measures of youth life satisfaction. Following systematic literature searches, empirical studies (n = 47) of youth LS measures are reviewed. The review provides an overview of each instrument outlining its normative samples, reliability, and validity. Recommended future research directions are briefly discussed.

Youth life satisfaction: A review of the literature

Abstract
Proctor, C. L., Linley, P. A., & Maltby, J.
Journal of Happiness Studies, 10 (5), 583-630
(Publication year: 2009)

A central construct within the positive psychology literature is life satisfaction. Whereas adult life satisfaction has been studied extensively, the life satisfaction of children and adolescents has only received attention more recently. This article provides a review of the extant research on youth life satisfaction. Empirical studies (n = 141) on life satisfaction among youth are reviewed. The review details how life satisfaction among youth relates to various other important emotional, social, and behavioural constructs. Evidenced by the review are the conditions that foster positive life satisfaction and the implications of positive life satisfaction among youth. Future directions in life satisfaction research among youth are briefly discussed.